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afford it. get california working again-for all of us. >> couric: tonight the threat of terror, a plot is uncovered for a series of attacks across europe and prosecutors say a simulation shows that the failed attack in times square would have been devastating. i'm katie couric. also tonight, new safety questions about regional jets. after landing gear failures on a number of canadian-built planes. >> stay down! stay down! >> couric: and a new treatment for the most common cancer in babies and children produces exciting results. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the world watched stunned as terrorists trained in pakistan attacked mumbai, india, nearly two years ago. they killed more than 170 people and wounded 300. now officials say terrorists tied to al qaeda have been planning new attacks just like it in europe, and some of the recent c.i.a. drone attacks in pakistan may have been launched to disrupt the plot. justice correspondent bob orr is following t
, they are. u.s. and european officials say the plot called for a spectacular multipronged attack on numerous cities in great britain, france, denmark, and germany. teams of terrorists, trained by an al qaeda-linked group along the pakistan-afghan border, plan to carry out commando-style shooting sprees. patterned on the mumbai attacks of 2008. sources describe the plot as credible, but say it was discovered at an early stage and had not gone operational. still, terror experts say there is much they don't know. >> the only thing i think that is fairly, fairly concrete is that it would have taken place in germany and other european countries. >> reporter: intelligence officials are concerned that squads of trained terrorists are still on the loose, so plot has not been completely wrapped up. >> they know that al qaeda intends to send operatives into western capitals with mumbai-style attacks against soft targets in cities. but they don't know who they are. they don't necessarily know where they are. 7. >> reporter: while there is no indication this particular plot targeted america, secretary o
to that at 6:00 tonight. until then, thanks for watching us at 5:00. good night. >> couric: tonight, scenes from a nightmare. an entire neighborhood near san francisco explodes in flames after a natural gas pipeline breaks. now rescue teams search the rubble for victims. i'm katie couric in los angeles. also tonight, it just keeps getting stranger. that pastor threatening to burn korans makes an ultimatum and now his daughter says she fears he's gone mad. changing the way cancer cells behave. a revolution in the fight against this deadly disease. and you can make a difference in the battle. join us tonight as we stand up to cancer. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric reporting tonight from los angeles. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we're here at the sony studios for tonight's special stand up to cancer program. we'll have more about that later. but first, our top story. a deadly disaster that wiped out an entire neighborhood here in california. it was just before 6:30 last evening people in the city of san bruno were just sitting down to dinner.
. a revolution in the fight against this deadly disease. and you can make a difference in the battle. join us tonight as we stand up to cancer. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric reporting tonight from los angeles. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we're here at the sony studios for tonight's special stand up to cancer program. we'll have more about that later. but first, our top story. a deadly disaster that wiped out an entire neighborhood here in california. it was just before 6:30 last evening people in the city of san bruno were just sitting down to dinner. then suddenly, without warning, a tremendous explosion. a natural gas pipeline ruptured, setting off a fire that burned 15 acres and destroyed 38 homes. 24 hours later, firefighters were still trying to contain the flames, rescue teams were searching for victims, and investigators were looking for answers. san bruno is a city of 41,000 in northern california just south of san francisco. look at this. claremont drive before the explosion, and now claremont drive tonight, in ruins. john blackst
family says they didn't put up the money and the u.s. government didn't, either. so who really did remains a mystery. katie? >> couric: elizabeth palmer, thank you. alex fattal is the brother of josh fattal, one of the two hikers still being held in iran. alex, what is your reaction to sarah's release? i know all the families are very close. >> yeah. well, we're overjoyed to see her out. she's had a long and difficult detention, 14 months solitary confinement so it's wonderful she is free. of course we wish she was out with josh and shane. >> couric: i know that it's been reported that the iranians asked for $500,000 in bail for her release and that money was deposited in an iranian bank. do you know who paid for this, if money exchanged hands? >> we really don't have any information about that. >> couric: we see josh in this photograph wearing the green t- shirt. have you heard anything from iranian officials about his possible release? >> no, we haven't heard anything about that. the last thing he said to sarah's mother nora when the mothers were leaving iran was "we're all broth
. the dramatic video that's raising new questions about police using taser guns. >> stop resisting! stop resisting! >> and a group of young people who have made happiness contagious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> good evening. katie is off. much of the east coast is on alert tonight for hurricane earl. as many as 26 million people could soon be feeling its impact. even if the storm never makes landfall. earl is a category three storm right now with sustained winds of more than 111 miles an hour. the eye now less than 200 miles from cape hatteras, north carolina, and it's outer banks that could be the first to feel the effects of the hurricane before it takes an expected turn to the northeast. warnings and watches are up from north carolina, where at least 100,000 people have been ordered to evacuate the coast; all the way up to the canadian border. as this view from space demstraights, earl is a particularly large hurricane b400 miles across. we have a team of correspondents stationed along t
at college. now her death is sparking some action. mary joins us now with the fallout on the murder of yeardley love. >> a college campus dedicates an entire day to improving campus safety and preventing violence. it's happening now at the university of virginia, five months after the death of yeardley love. >> reporter: yeardley love grew up in cockeysville and was weeks away from graduating when police say her ex-boyfriend, attacked and killed her inside her off-campus apartment. >> beautiful young woman who had everything going for herself. there's no reason she shouldn't be here. >> today's students, faculty and staff, participated in an event called day of dialogue. featured discussions, a resource fair and a public art project called lines of darkness and light that veiled the collins university historic rotunda with black fog. both love and huguely played well cross at uva. they said today, athletics has been a strong supporter of this movement. >> every coach who was not actually competing today or doing key recruiting is here. and in fact, as you looked around here, craig l
into discovery headquarters wearing two backpacks and some containers, canisters that witnesses told us look like pipe bombs. so police are still in there searching, trying to learn if those packs and canisters are, indeed, explosive before they can sound the all-clear. harry? >> smith: wyatt andrews outside discovery headquarters tonight. thanks. our other big story is hurricane earl. the governors of north carolina, virginia, and maryland have declared states of emergency as the storm moves closer and grows stronger. it is a category four again with 135 mile an hour winds and it cuts an imposing image in the latest photo from space. at last report, earl was about 600 miles south-southeast of cape hatteras, north carolina. it could reach there late tomorrow or early friday, then roll up the east coast. hurricane watches and warnings are up as far north as cape cod. kelly cobiella is in kill devil hills, north carolina, tonight and has the latest. kelly, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, harry. despite a picture-perfect beach day here, some tourists and locals alike on the most remote of t
romney and mike huckabee. >> the small elite don't get us. they call us whacky. they call us wing nuts. we call us "we the people." ( cheers and applause ) >> reporter: delaware's new republican senate nominee was at home in this crowd of social conservatives. but even as she preached a return to fiscal conservatism, o'donnell's own unorthodox spending habits were starting to come under heavy scrutiny. staffers on her previous campaign for senate and o'donnell's own financial filings reveal that the unemployed o'donnell used campaign funds to pay for meals, gas, bowling trips, and personal rent, even long after the campaign had ended. >> i've never seen a candidate who just stole all their campaign money and used it for personal use. what it seems like here is christine o'donnell had no other way to support herself so she thought, okay, i'll run for u.s. senate. >> reporter: the nonpartisan watchdog group citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington is urging the u.s. attorney in delaware to open a criminal investigation. >> it's not sloppiness, it's out-and-out theft. >> repor
to the wealthiest 2% of americans. to do that would require us to go out and borrow $700 billion, again, to give tax cuts to the most fortunate 2% of americans. and we think that's not a responsible use of taxpayer resources at a time when we face enormous challenges. and we think if republicans want to do more to help the economy now, again, the best thing to do besides extending these middle-class tax cuts is to give stronger incentives to businesses to invest in america now. >> couric: but you keep hammering home that 2% of the wealthiest americans. but tens of thousands of small businesses and other businesses in this country make $250,000 a year. so aren't you going to be hurting them? >> if you look at the joint-- what the joint tack committee has said, 80% of those 2% of americans affected by this are people and businesses who make more than a million dollars a year. and, again, what we're proposing, katie, is to restore those tax rates to the levels they were in the late, which was a period we had remarkably strong economic growth. >> couric: 10 million jobs have been lost. many of them are
an investigation. she shares her story with us in the studio "early" this tuesday she shares her story with us in the studio "early" this tuesday morning, september 14th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. great to have you with us here on "the early show." >> it's tuesday. beautiful day outside. i'm harry smith. a lot of people looking at what's going on out in the atlantic. already established igor is a category 4. julia is now a hurricane, as well. they're making their way westward through the atlantic. we'll keep an eye on where they're heading. igor, unfortunately, has got a real bead on bermuda. and our dave price, dr. science himself, will be along in a few minutes to explain exactly where those storms are headed. >> dr. science or dr. weather. a little bit of both. first we turn to politics this morning. the tea party and voter anger. there are more primary lessons today around the country and tea party candidates are hoping to upset more established republicans. cbs news correspondental correspondent nancy cordes is in washington with the latest.
'm harry smith. >> i'm erica hill. good to have you with us this morning. a lot to get to this morning, including some fascinating, exclusive interviews. the woman from arizona, derri velarde, is here in the studio with us this morning. she'll join us live to tell her story. >>> also this morning, the big headline, piers morgan gets larry king's job. people have seen him on a talent show, but people across america say, who is this guy? matt holden, our good pal, they're very good friends. we have an exclusive with amanda and piers and she'll tell us about the guy. interesting newspaper bag ground. he may actually have the right feet to fill those shoes. >> oh, looking forward to that. >>> first, we want to begin with the latest on that deadly flooding in texas where the aftermath of tropical storm hermine spawned a series of tornadoes and dumped up to 8 inches of rain. robbie owens of our affiliate ktvt is with us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. on the heel of hermine a series of tornadoes ripped through the area, leaving behind damage like this and capping a day
limitations on pesticides have made killing them more difficult. costing the u.s. $258 million last year. >> immediately bagged up any of the materials that were in the near proximity to that book. bagged themuf and removed them from the building. >> reporter: right now, all of the contaminated books are in this truck, which is baking in the sun in the inside of a parking lot. once the inside reaches 120 degrees, the critters should die. but the sun and containment aren't the only remedies. all eight have been sprayed with pesticides. >> they don't know what causes a.l.s. and parkinsons. but some have tie today to that stuff. >> reporter: but most are confident in the cleanup. >> it's a nice, quiet, relaxing environment. >> you're going to keep using it? >> yes. >> some might think it's overkill the way we've addressed the problem. but we think it's something if handled quickly, we're going to be better off for it. >> reporter: as a courtesy to library users, the urbana library is planning to wave all late fees until friday. and it could be open as early as sometime tomorrow. reporting
for us tonight. thank you. in afghanistan, the taliban has been using this controversy to win new recruits. today, cbs news obtained taliban leaflets that urged villagers to join them in seeking revenge. mandy clark is in kabul tonight. >> reporter: the leaflet said that america is the biggest enemy of islam and called on muslims to take revenge for the burning of the koran. the leaflets have been handwritten and dropped in paktia province. cancer they've been distributed taliban on motor bikes to small villages. most villagers are illiterate, so the leaflets would have been left with imams to read out in mosques and spread the word that way. the taliban has capitalized on the controversy at the holiest time of the year for muslims, a time when the mosques will be packed with followers. mandy clark, cbs news, kabul. >> smith: we want to bring in juan zarate. good evening. >> good evening, harry. >> smith: how much damage has already been done by this? >> well, harry, some damage has already been done. we've seen protests in muslim capitals around the world. we just heard about the
nighttime operations, aimed at high-value targets that are a key part of the war strategy. u.s. forces have been swarming into the outskirts of kandahar in an effort to flush the taliban out of its traditional stronghold. the taliban was quick to announce that it shot the black hawk down with rocket-propelled grenades. but nato says there was no enemy fire anywhere in the area. >> the doubting of a... downing of a helicopter whether it was accident, weather related or enemy related, to a certain extent it's to be expected when you have more people, more soldiers, more helicopters in that region. >> reporter: u.s. forces in afghanistan rely heavily on helicopters for everything from transport to close aerial support. this is a rugged mountainous country and the roads are often littered with improvised bombs. this is one of the deadliest helicopter crashes since the war began in afghanistan with the surge now complete. american troops are going on more missions and that means more risk and more casualties. mandy clark, cbs news, kabul. >> couric: in this country, the continuing saga of bell,
u.s. forces in afghanistan, told the "wall street journal" burning the koran could endanger troops and the overall effort. kelly cobiella is in gainesville tonight. kelly, so far the pastor is refusing to change his plans. >> reporter: he's absolutely sticking with this right now, katie. kerry jones says he's not doing this as a publicity stunt. he says he feels a real religious calling and he refuses to back down. >> sooner or later we're going to have to say no to radical islam. >> reporter: terry jones believes radical islam could take over america and the best way to fight back is by sending a radical message: burning a stack of korans on the anniversary of 9/11. >> we see an element of islam that is very radical and we could not get their attention by just sending some type of message. we thought this was a radical message that will get their attention. >> reporter: jones know it is actions of his small church are being felt around the world and he's heard the warnings from general petraeus that his actions could put american soldiers' lives at risk. >> we understand what the
. >> these numbers are telling us that the economy is not falling off a cliff. it's not booming, either, which is the bad news. >> reporter: but the median length of unemployment fell below 20 weeks in august. it had been 22.2 weeks in july. 19,000 construction jobs were added last month, and 17,000 temporary jobs. nearly 400,000 temporary jobs have been added over the past year as employers have remained cautious. >> there's a great uncertainty the economy right now. >> reporter: daniel herrick is c.f.o. of pilla performance eyewear in connecticut. a year ago his company had five employees. today it has 18. >> almost all of you are expansion has been with the use of temp employees. >> reporter: that still means work for louisa ola. >> i'm still pinching myself. >> reporter: after two years of looking, she finally landed a temporary job as a bookkeeper. >> for the first time in two years i didn't have to call unemployment. i didn't have to get up at 5:00 in the morning to get online with unemployment. it was wonderful. >> reporter: but it could be a while before others share that feeling, says
becomes the most destructive in state history. >>> koran outrage. concern grows for u.s. citizens around the world as a florida pastor continues his plan to burn the holy muslim book this weekend. we'll have reaction from the only muslim member of congress. >>> and an "early show" exclusive. the victim of that brutal acid attack in arizona opens up about the moment that changed her life, and her fight to keep her family together, early this thursday morning, september 9th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, here on a thursday. i'm harry smith. >> and i'm erica hill. a lot to get to this morning including some fascinating exclusive interviews. the woman from arizona, derri velarde, who was burned in an acid attack is here in the studio with us this morning. she'll join us live to tell her story. >> also the big headline, piers morgan gets larry king's job. people have seen him on a talent show, whatever it is, but people across america say who is this guy. our amanda holden, our good pal, they're very good friends. we have an exclusive with amanda and piers and sh
would manage it really. don't like that idea. we can't afford andy harris' idea. >>> mary joins us now with more. >>> days after the nearly abandoned towson complex was auctioned off, a new apartment complex was auctioned. and officials are ready for more luxury. >>> developers and county officials are standing inside this building. it is called the palisades of towson. 351 studio. they're filled with amen its, including custom closet organizing systems. bamboo flooring. kohler fixtures in bathrooms. and an automated parking garage that parks your car for you. >> all of this in the heart of towson. today, we're taking another giant step forward in the renaissance of towson and changed the skyline of this community with the opening of this new, beautiful apartment complex. >>> on tuesday, towson saw what doesn't happen. shoppers now lured to the luxury ring in towson town center. developers and county officials are betting on it. >>> almost. 500 million have taken place. >>> apartments for the palisades start at just over $1200 a month for a studio and go up to 2400 for a two-bedroom ap
further when he said most of the world believes the u.s. government orchestrated the 9/11 attacks to benefit israel. today, president obama responded. chief white house correspondent chip reid is here covering the united nations meeting. chip? >> reporter: well, katie, today president obama came out swinging, but there is no sign the iranian president is backing down. president obama had strong words today for iranian president ahmadinejad who suggested in a speech at the united nations yesterday that the u.s. government was behind the 9/11 attacks. >> well, it was offensive, it was hateful. >> reporter: especially, he said because the comments were made not far from ground zero. >> where families lost their loved ones, people of all faiths all ethnicities. for them to make a statement like that was inexcusable. >> reporter: in an interview intended to air in iran, mr. obama also called the statement disgusting and said it stands in contrast to the response of the iranian people after 9/11. >> when there were candlelight vigils and i think a natural sense of shared humanity and sy
to him." katie? >> katie: nancy cordes on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy, thank you. turning overseas now, two months after monsoon floods inundated pakistan, the situation there is only getting worse. nearly two million homes were damaged or destroyed and today unicef said 105,000 children under five years old could die from malnutrition. earlier today i spoke with pakistan's foreign minister shah mahmood qureshi about a number of things, including the crisis in his country. your country is still reeling from devastating floods. the acumen fund, which is a nonprofit organization here in the u.s., recently visited is the area and came back with some very moving, tragic images. can you describe the level of human suffering there. >> it's huge. you've never had a natural disaster of this nag any tuesday before. the area the size of the united kingdom is underwater. 20 million people in pakistan have been affected by these floods. shelterless. billions of dollars worth of standing crops have been lost. livestock. so it's a very serious situation we're dealing with. >> couric: the united
inside of it, yet at this point they have not been able to release to us exactly what his connection was. >> all right. bottom line here is we have this house in hercules where they have found, they say, a second body. >> reporter: that's right. >> all right. joe vazquez, in the newsroom, thank you for the update. we'll of course be bringing you new information as soon as we get it here into the newsroom at cbs 5. >>> well, we have learned today that a bay area woman who spent more than a year in a jail in iran is going to be coming home. sarah shourd is one of three hikers all uc-berkeley alums that iran accused of spying. simon perez at uc-berkeley and what may be behind this sudden move. simon. >> reporter: well, allen, the families are really taking a wait-and-see attitude with this announcement. they don't want to get their hopes up too high too soon. >>> reporter: the iranian government has confirmed its plan to release 31-year-old sarah shourd, who has been kept in solitary confinement for more than a year. sarah's mother norah didn't walk to talk to the media as she left her sist
>> couric: tonight, president obama fires back at the president of iran for suggesting the u.s. government was behind 9/11. >> for him to make a statement like that was inexcusable. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, land of lakes. flooding in the upper midwest forces hundreds out of their homes. a bizarre bank robbery in florida. thieves turn a teller into what appeared to be a human bomb. and colbert tries to develop a rapport with congress. >> i'm not a fan of the government doing anything, but i've got to ask, why isn't the government doing anything? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the gathering of world leaders at the united nations here in new york this week has not done much to improve relations between the united states and iran. in fact, president mahmoud ahmadinejad strained them even further when he said most of the world believes the u.s. government orchestrated the 9/11 attacks to benefit israel. today, president obama responded. ch
is just 45% and with nearly 15 million people out of work, dean reynolds tells us it's all about the economy. >> reporter: the economy remains the number-one problem to most americans and only one in five thinks it's improving. >> no, it's not being fixed. it's being smoothed over to make it look good, to make it look like people are filling jobs. >> we're kind of stalled right now. we need to move in some direction. >> reporter: other sobering findings for the white house: only 38% think the president has a clear plan for creating jobs and some 46% think the obama stimulus package has had no impact. 20% think it made matters worse. but 63% say mr. obama is doing about as well as they expected. >> it's too soon to make any final assessment of his presidency. i think he will be better and better as time passes. >> reporter: actually, the country still blames the bush administration for the condition of the economy followed by wall street. and only 27% believe congressional republicans are doing more to improve things. compared to 49% who say that about the president. sam greco is
who helped create him. has gordon gekko gone all soft on us? >> soft, no. but he's got a heart. he's not soft. he's a tough guy. >> reporter: is there a little oliver stone in gordon gekko? >> sure there is, of course. >> reporter: a walk back down wall street with oliver stone later on sunday morning. >> osgood: don't try this at home is more than just a warning. when you attend the sort of event our bill geist just survived. >> reporter: now you might think saturday night in omaha sounds a little dull. but when they start lighting the roler derby girls on fire, you'll think again. one reason saturday night was an absolute blast. you'll see for yourselves later on sunday morning. >> osgood: we'll also remember simon and gar garfunkel's big concert in the park. hear from the man who reorganized the auto industry, consider what's in a name with the fast draw and more. but first here are the headline for this september 19, 2010. last sunday morning of summer. after spending over a year in an iranian jail, sarah shourd is now home. she's one of three american hikers charged with spyin
. but before you feel completely deflated by this latest news, anthony mason tells us there are at least some signs of a turnaround, at least on the home front. >> reporter: in los angeles, so many of the 27,000 foreclosed houses have fallen into disrepair. >> we felt we needed to do something about it. >> reporter: today the city raised fines on banks that don't keep up their properties. >> it's $1,000 per day, per violation. and they can take up to $100,000 per property. >> reporter: with more than five million people behind on their mortgage payments, bank repossessions have hit record levels. >> we're on a pace right now to see about 1.2 million homes repossessed by the end of the year. that's simile unprecedented in the history of the housing market. >> reporter: the banks have taken possession of about 900,000 homes, only about a third of which are actually on the market. >> the banks could be flooding the market with a lot more distressed properties, and i think the fact that they're not is showing some restraint in trying to keep the housing market stable. >> reporter: americans are g
dreams. until you know how chantix may affect you, use caution when driving or operating machinery. chantix should not be taken with other quit-smoking products. ♪ my benjamin, he helped me with the countdown. "ben, how many days has it been?" "5 days, mom. 10 days, mom." i think after 30 days he got tired of counting. [ male announcer ] talk to your doctor about chantix. find out how you can save money on your prescription and learn terms and conditions at chantix.com. find out how you can save money on your prescription and people like what we're saying.. about how fusion is projected to hold its resale value better than camry. and has better quality than accord. as a matter of fact, people like what we're saying so much, ford fusion is now the 2010 motor trend car of the year. the fusion, from ford. get in . . . and drive one. >> couric: those tainted eggs we mentioned earlier have a lot of people asking "now do i know my food is safe?" government agencies are supposed to be regulating the food supply, but taken together, they make up an alphabet soup of oversight, a recipe ch
can be separated from shale deep understood ground. but some experts say chemicals used in the process can poison drinking water and as armen keteyian reports, hundreds showed up at a federal hearing today in western new york to debate the issue. >> safe drilling now! >> reporter: the e.p.a. hearings in binghampton have become a battleground over fracking, a method of extraction that has high rewards for companies and some say higher risks for communities. what's driving the drilling rush are advances in hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, a process whereby millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are blasted deep understood ground, forcing cracks in the shale, freeing natural gas for collection. it's at the surface from where problems have been reported. like blowouts and spills into groundwater. and as depicted in the hbo documentary "gasland," ignition at the kitchen sink. >> whoa! >> there's no such thing as zero-impact drilling. >> reporter: binghamton, new york, sits near the marcellus shale, an energy rich formation stretching from new york to tennessee that's estima
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)